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  • IDPH News Release: Celebrate the Fourth of July Safely with Food Hygiene Tips for Cookouts & Picnics

    June 29th, 2022

    20220629_IDPH_FourthJulySafetyFINAL

  • IDPH News Alert: IDPH Warns Public to Avoid Tick Bites as Summer Season Gets Underway

    June 16th, 2022

    20220615_IDPH_News_Release_Tick_Seas

  • Kendall County Cooling Center List Updated

    June 13th, 2022

    Kendall County’s Cooling Center List can be found here:

    Cooling Center List

     

     

  • IEPA IDPH News Release – Illinois Officials Remind Residents to Use Caution When Recreating in Illinois Waters and Be Aware of Harmful Algal Blooms

    June 9th, 2022

    20220609_IEPA-IDPH_Harmful_Algal_Blo

  • IDPH News Release – Illinois Department of Public Health Warns Public to Watch Out for Rabid Bats and Other Animals

    May 26th, 2022

    IDPH NEWS RELEASE

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:                                               CONTACT:

    May 26, 2022                                                                         [email protected]

    Illinois Department of Public Health Warns Public to Watch Out for Rabid Bats and Other Animals

    SPRINGFIELD –With the weather warming up, the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is warning the public to beware of rabid animals, especially bats, as they become more active this time of year.  IDPH has received reports of four rabid bats in the state since May 15 from Champaign, Jackson, Macon, and Will counties.

    “While there is a preventive treatment for rabies, it is one of the deadliest diseases we know,” said IDPH Acting Director Amaal Tokars. “Bats are the most common carriers of the rabies virus in Illinois and are responsible for the vast majority of human rabies cases in the United States in recent years. But they are not the only carrier of rabies. The public should be not approach bats or any wild, unfamiliar or stray animal, and any animal that appears to be sick.”

    IDPH stressed that a bite from a rabid animal can be potentially fatal if not  treated and that public should take precautions to keep bats out of their homes.

    IDPH is also reminding the public make sure that rabies vaccinations are up-to-date for pets and any valuable livestock and horses for whom a rabies vaccine is available. If a pet is exposed to a high-risk wild animal – such as a bat, skunk, raccoon, fox or coyote — you should contact a veterinarian for advice immediately.

    Rabies is a virus that affects the nervous system (brain and nerves).  People can get rabies after being bitten by an infected animal.  Rabies can also be contracted when saliva or spit from a rabid animal gets directly into a person’s eyes, nose, mouth, or a wound.  People usually know when they have been bitten by a bat, but bats have very small teeth and the bite mark may not be easy to see.  If you find yourself in close proximity to a bat and are not sure if you were exposed, for example – you wake up and find a bat in your room, do not kill or release the bat before calling your doctor or local health department to help determine if you could have been exposed to rabies and need preventive treatment (i.e. vaccines or other products to stop you from getting Rabies).  If the bat is available for testing and test results are negative, preventive treatment is not needed.

    If you have been bitten by any animal, seek immediate medical attention. Animal bites may also become infected with bacteria. Rabies preventive treatment, if needed, must begin quickly.

    An animal does not have to be aggressive or exhibit other symptoms to have rabies.  Changes in any animal’s normal behavior can be early signs of rabies.  A bat that is active during the day, found on the ground, or is unable to fly is more likely than others to be rabid.  Such bats are often easily approached, but should never be handled.

    The following tips can help prevent the spread of rabies:

    • Do not touch, feed, or unintentionally attract wild animals with open garbage cans or litter.
    • Never adopt wild animals or bring them into your home.  Do not try to nurse sick, wild animals to health.  Call animal control or an animal rescue agency for assistance.
    • Teach children never to handle unfamiliar animals, wild or domestic, even if they appear friendly.  “Love your own, leave other animals alone” is a good principle for children to learn to reduce the risk of exposures to rabid animals.
    • Maintain homes and other buildings so bats cannot get inside.
    • If a bat is in your home, do not release the bat outdoors until after speaking with animal control or public health officials.
    • After consulting with animal control or public health officials, the bat may need to be captured for rabies testing to determine if you need preventive treatment.

    Steps you can take to capture the bat if animal control is not available are:

    • When the bat lands, approach it slowly, while wearing gloves, and place a box or coffee can over it.
    • Slide a piece of cardboard under the container to trap the bat inside.
    • Tape the cardboard to the container securely, and punch small holes in the cardboard, allowing the bat to breathe.
    • Do not come into physical contact with a bat.

    For more information about rabies and keeping bats out of your home, visit the IDPH website.

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  • IDPH News Release – Public Health Officials Warn About Salmonella Outbreak Linked to JIF Peanut Butter

    May 24th, 2022

    IDPH NEWS RELEASE

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    May 24, 2022

    CONTACT:
    [email protected]

    Public Health Officials Warn about Salmonella Outbreak Linked to Jif Peanut Butter

    CHICAGO – The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is working with local health departments, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Senftenberg. Epidemiologic and laboratory data show that some Jif brand peanut butters may be contaminated with Salmonella and are making people sick.

    According to the CDC, fourteen people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Senftenberg have been reported from twelve states. Illnesses started on dates ranging from February 17, 2022 through May 1, 2022. Illinois has one case included in this outbreak investigation from Central Illinois.

    On May 20, 2022, J.M. Smucker Company recalled multiple types of Jif brand peanut butter. The company advised consumers to check the list of recalled products to see if they possess any of the recalled products. They should check the lot code number on the container to see if it is between 1274425 through 2140425, with “425” at the end of the first 7 numbers. The lot code number is located next to the best buy date. Consumers who have products matching the above description in their possession are advised to dispose of them immediately. They should not eat, sell, or serve recalled Jif peanut butter to humans or animals, including dogs and birds. Wash surfaces and containers that may have touched the recalled peanut butter using hot, soapy water.
    Symptoms of illness caused by Salmonella may include headache, muscle aches, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal cramping, chills, fever, nausea, and dehydration. If these symptoms are experienced 12 to 72 hours after eating Jif brand peanut butters, people should contact a health care provider and let them know they have recently eaten Jif peanut butter.

    IDPH is working with local health departments to identify additional cases and perform lab testing. Investigators are working to determine if additional products are contaminated. For the most up to date recall list, go to the FDA website to see a list of recalled products.

    For more information and examples of where to find the lot code, go to: https://www.fda.gov/food/outbreaks-foodborne-illness/outbreak-investigation-salmonella-peanut-butter-may-2022.

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  • IDPH News Release – IDPH Endorses Federal Authorization of COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Dose for Children 5 Through 11 Years

    May 20th, 2022

    Illinois e-News Release

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:    
    May 20, 2022      

    CONTACT:
    [email protected]

    IDPH Endorses Federal Authorization of COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Dose for Children 5 through 11 Years

    SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced today that it supports yesterday’s recommendation by the CDC of the Pfizer-BioNTechCOVID-19 booster dose for children aged 5 to 11 years old. IDPH issued an advisory to vaccine providers throughout the state endorsing the booster for children 5 through 11 years of age at least five months after completion of a primary series with the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, following the emergency use authorization this week by the FDA and the recommendation of the CDC.

    “We encourage every parent or guardian of children five and older to consider a booster vaccination for their eligible child,” said IDPH Director Amaal Tokars. “And if your children have not yet received their primary dose, it’s not too late to start now. Especially with cases rising throughout the state, everyone who is eligible for vaccination should be taking advantage of the opportunity to get vaccinated and boosted. Vaccination remains the strongest way to protect yourself and your loved ones from COVID-19.”

    In recommending the booster dose for children aged 5 to 11, the CDC noted that since the pandemic began, more than 4.8 million children ages 5 through 11 have been diagnosed with COVID-19, 15,000 have been hospitalized and, tragically, over 180 have died.

    As cases increase across the country, a booster dose will safely help restore and enhance protection against severe disease, the CDC said. Public health officials said that while COVID-19 tends to be less severe in children than adults, the omicron wave has seen more kids getting sick with the disease and being hospitalized. In addition, children may also experience longer term effects, such as long Covid syndrome, even following initially mild disease. These vaccines, which were authorized for children in November 2021, help protect children from both serious complications and long Covid syndrome.

    Federal authorities are currently considering authorization of a COVID-19 vaccine for children under 5.

    Since the COVID-19 vaccine became available to the public, millions of eligible adults and children across the state of Illinois have received their COVID-19 vaccine or booster dose.
    Illinois remains among the highest in the Midwest for its vaccination rates, with more than two thirds of the population fully vaccinated.

    More than 22 million vaccines have been administered in Illinois and among children 5 to 11, more than 40% have at least one dose; more than 36 percent are fully vaccinated. Of the total population, more than 76% has received at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose; more than 69% of Illinois’ total population is fully vaccinated; and 52% of the vaccinated population is boosted according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Data indicates that the risk of hospitalization and severe outcomes from COVID-19 is much higher for unvaccinated people than for those who are up to date on their vaccinations.

    To find a COVID-19 vaccination location near you, go to www.vaccines.gov.

    In addition, the federal government has established a website that provides an all-purpose toolkit that provides information on how to obtain masks, treatment, vaccines and testing resources for all areas of the country at: https://www.covid.gov/.

    Attachments
  • IDPH Issues Warning About Three Potential Cases of Severe Hepatitis in Children in Illinois

    April 25th, 2022

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:                                         CONTACT:

    April 25, 2022                                                             [email protected]

    IDPH Issues Warning About Three Potential Cases of Severe Hepatitis in Children in Illinois

    Department Urges Illinois Healthcare Providers to be on the Lookout and to Report Potential Cases to Public Health Authorities

    SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) announced today that it has learned of three suspected cases of severe hepatitis in children under ten years of age, potentially linked to a strain of adenovirus. Two of the cases are in suburban Chicago and one is in Western Illinois. One case resulted in a liver transplant. IDPH is working to learn of other suspected cases in Illinois and is asking healthcare providers in the state to be on the lookout for symptoms and to report any suspected cases of hepatitis in children of unknown origin to local public health authorities.

    The IDPH announcement follows a nationwide alert issued by the CDC in response to a cluster of nine cases of hepatitis of unknown origin in children in Alabama ranging in age from 1 to 6 years old, all of whom were previously healthy.

    The CDC said that symptoms of hepatitis, or inflammation of the liver, include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, light-colored stools, joint pain, and jaundice and can be caused by viruses. These cases appear to have an association with adenovirus 41. Adenoviruses spread from person-to-person and most commonly cause respiratory illness, but depending on the type, can also cause other illnesses such as gastroenteritis (inflammation of the stomach or intestines), conjunctivitis (pink eye), and cystitis (bladder infection). Adenovirus type 41 typically presents as diarrhea, vomiting and fever, and is often accompanied by respiratory symptoms. While there have been case reports of hepatitis in immunocompromised children with adenovirus infection, adenovirus type 41 is not known to be a cause of hepatitis in otherwise healthy children.

    CDC said it is working with state health departments to see if there are additional U.S. cases, and what may be causing these cases. At this time, CDC said it believes adenovirus may be the cause for these reported cases, but investigators are still learning more – including ruling out other possible causes and identifying other possible contributing factors.

    CDC is asking physicians to consider adenovirus testing using PCR or NAAT on respiratory samples, stool or rectal swabs and whole blood for pediatric patients with hepatitis of unknown etiology, and to report any possible cases of hepatitis of unknown origin to CDC and state public health authorities.

    In addition, CDC is encouraging parents and caregivers to be aware of the symptoms of hepatitis, and to contact their healthcare provider with any concerns. CDC continues to recommend children be up to date on all their vaccinations, and that parents and caregivers of young children take the same everyday preventive actions that it recommends for everyone, including washing hands often, avoiding people who are sick, covering coughs and sneezes, and avoiding touching the eyes, nose or mouth.

    For more information, go to: https://emergency.cdc.gov/han/2022/han00462.asp

  • IDPH Issues Warning that COVID-19 Cases are Slowly Rising in Many Areas of the State

    April 14th, 2022

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:                                                           CONTACT:

    April 14, 2022                                                                                     [email protected]

    IDPH Issues Warning that COVID-19 Cases are Slowly Rising in Many Areas of the State

    Public Health Director Urges Illinoisans to Monitor Local COVID-19 Case Counts and to Protect Themselves by Remaining Up-to-date on Vaccinations

    SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) issued a warning today that COVID-19 case rates are slowly rising in many areas of the state and that members of the public should be paying close attention to conditions in their local communities and staying up-to-date on their vaccination status.

    “While hospitalizations and deaths tied to COVID-19 remain stable at this time, we are seeing a slow increase in cases in many areas of the State,” said Acting IDPH Director Amaal Tokars. “This is a reminder that we all need to remain vigilant and remain up to date on our vaccination status. This is especially important for those who are at higher risk for serious outcomes.”  

    Tokars stressed that vaccination is the most effective tool we have to fight the virus – and that it is easy to find a COVID-19 vaccination location near you by either calling your local health provider or going to www.vaccines.gov.

    The State of Illinois remains strongly positioned to respond in the event of a new COVID-19 surge. The State stockpile of tests has been replenished, with more than 1.5 million rapid tests on hand, and a half a million more on the way. In addition, hospitals, schools, and long term care facilities have been urged take steps to increase their current testing capacity.

    The State is also supporting pharmacies and healthcare providers in efforts to increase their inventories of the various FDA-authorized treatments in case of another surge. IDPH is advising providers to assess their patients quickly, within five days of the onset of symptoms, after a COVID-19 diagnosis to determine if they are eligible for treatment.

    IDPH is also reminding the public about the recent guidance from the CDC that authorized a second booster dose for certain segments of the population at least four months after the first booster dose. This includes adults over 50 years of age, and people who are immunocompromised – those with a poor ability to fight infections – over 12 years old.

    State health officials are stressing the following precautions, which are critically important for those who are at high risk for serious illness:

    • Get vaccinated and stay up-to-date on recommended booster shots to protect yourself, your loved ones and friends.
    • If you are in an area with rising  COVID-19 infections, wear a mask if entering indoor spaces with other people present and consider avoiding large gatherings.
    • Stick to well-ventilated areas if you are not wearing a mask indoors around other people.
    • If you feel flu-like symptoms, self-isolate and stay home from work as well as social gatherings; and obtain a test as quickly as possible.
    • If you test positive, talk to your provider immediately so you can get COVID-19 treatment within five days of starting to feel sick. Also, communicate about the positive result with any persons you have been in close contact within two days of falling sick or testing positive.
    • Continue to frequently wash your hands and cover coughs and sneezes.

    For more information, go to:  https://dph.illinois.gov/covid19.html.

    The federal government recently established a new website that provides an all-purpose toolkit that provides information on how to obtain masks, treatment, vaccines and testing resources for all areas of the country at: https://www.covid.gov/.

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  • IDPH Adopts New Federal Guidelines for Reporting COVID-19 Data

    April 12th, 2022

    Illinois e-News Release

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    April 12, 2022

    CONTACT:
    [email protected]

    IDPH Adopts New Federal Guidelines for Reporting COVID-19 Data

    CDC Guidelines End Reporting of Some Negative Test Results, Emphasize Case Rate and Hospitalizations in Measuring COVID-19 Community Levels

    SPRINGFIELD – The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) is adopting new federal guidelines for tracking COVID-19 at the community level. The new CDC guidelines emphasize the case rate and hospitalizations in order to better track the prevalence of COVID-19 in communities. As a result of these new guidelines, testing providers will no longer be required to report some negative tests and IDPH will therefore no longer report test and case positivity.

    In addition to adopting new CDC guidelines, IDPH is bolstering the data on its COVID-19 dashboard to provide additional information to help communities respond to changes in the course of the virus.

    Among the new data that has been or will be shared on the IDPH COVID-19 dashboard are the following:

    • Updated data on vaccination rates to reflect the full population eligible as eligibility continues to evolve.
      • The number of people admitted to the hospital with a COVID-19 diagnosis.
      • More detailed data on hospitalizations, including information about vaccination status in those who are hospitalized.

    “Test and case positivity rates were seen as a good way to monitor the level of community spread early in the pandemic,” said IDPH Acting Director Amaal Tokars. “At this stage, now that we have vaccines and effective therapies available, it is more useful to rely on data that indicates the case rate, disease severity and the level of strain on healthcare system to guide our public health recommendations.”

    The changes adopted by the CDC mean that states will no longer be required to report negative antigen test (rapid test) results – and are only required to report negative PCR and NAAT (Nucleic Acid Amplification Test) results that were performed in certified labs. In addition, the widespread use of at-home tests means that national testing data is not as comprehensive or representative of population-based testing as it was before the introduction of at-home tests.

    The CDC announced in March that is relying on these three metrics to determine the community level of COVID-19 and to classify it as low, medium or high:

    • Total new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 population in the past 7 days.
      • New COVID-19 admissions per 100,000 population in the past 7 days.
      • The percent of staffed inpatient beds occupied by COVID-19 patients.

    IDPH officials note that case rates for COVID-19 are now slowly rising in many areas of the state. However, hospitalizations and deaths continue to remain low at this time. Given that the spread of COVID-19 is increasing, it is critically important that those who are at high risk for serious illness take the following precautions:

    • Get vaccinated and stay up-to-date on recommended booster shots to protect yourself, your loved ones and friends.
      • If you are in an area with rising  COVID-19 infections, wear a mask if entering indoor spaces with other people present and consider avoiding large gatherings.
      • Stick to well-ventilated areas if you are not wearing a mask indoors around other people.
      • If you feel flu-like symptoms, self-isolate and stay home from work as well as social gatherings; and obtain a test as quickly as possible.
      • If you test positive, talk to your provider immediately so you can get COVID-19 treatment within five days of starting to feel sick. Also, communicate about the positive result with any persons you have been in close contact within two days of falling sick or testing positive.
      • Continue to frequently wash your hands and cover coughs and sneezes.

    In addition, on March 29, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued updated guidance that authorized a second booster dose for certain segments of the population at least four months after the first booster dose. This applies to adults over 50 years of age, and to immunocompromised individuals (those with a poor ability to fight infections) over 12 years old. The CDC also recommended a second booster dose with an mRNA vaccine for all those who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for both their primary dose and their first booster, four months after their first booster dose. Those who already received an mRNA booster dose after their initial Johnson and Johnson primary vaccine do not need an additional booster unless they are either over the age of 50 years or immunocompromised.

    The State of Illinois remains strongly positioned to respond in the event of a new COVID-19 surge. The State stockpile of tests is nearly fully replenished, with more than 1.5 million rapid tests on hand, and a half a million more on the way in the coming weeks. The State has also instructed hospitals, schools, and long term care facilities to consider their current testing capacity and take all preparations necessary. The State is also supporting pharmacies and healthcare providers in efforts to increase their inventories of the various FDA-authorized treatments in case of another surge. In Illinois, 99.4% of state residents have a pharmacy or clinic providing or dispensing treatment within 20 miles of where they live.

    For more information, go to:  https://dph.illinois.gov/covid19.html.

    Vaccination is the key to ending this pandemic.  To find a COVID-19 vaccination location near you, go to www.vaccines.gov.

    The federal government recently established a new website that provides an all-purpose toolkit that provides information on how to obtain masks, treatment, vaccines and testing resources for all areas of the country at: https://www.covid.gov/.

    Attachments – IDPH Adopts New Federal Guidelines for Reporting COVID-19 Data

  • Illinois Department of Agriculture – Avian Influenza Confirmed in Illinois Backyard Poultry

    March 14th, 2022

    03.12.22 Dept of Ag_Avian Flu Detected Backyard Flock

  • IDPH Health Alert – Powdered Infant Formula Recall

    February 18th, 2022

    20220218_Cronobacter_Health_Alert

  • IDPH COVID-19 Safety at Retreats, Conferences, and Large Business Meetings

    December 30th, 2021

    20211130_Adult_Retreat_Safety

     

  • IDPH COVID-19 Variant of Concern Health Advisory

    December 2nd, 2021

    20211201_COVID-19_Variant_of_Concern

     

  • IDPH – Health Alert Legionnaires’ Disease

    July 28th, 2021

    20210728_CDCS_Health_Alert_Legionell

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811 W. John Street, Yorkville, IL 60560   •   630-553-9100