811 W. John Street, Yorkville, IL 60560
For 24/7 Mental or Public Health Emergencies, call 630-553-9100
Monday - Thursday: 8:30am - 7:00pm   •   Friday: 8:30am - 4:30pm

Coronavirus Disease Update for Kendall County

January 25, 2021
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Case Counts* in Kendall County

Total Cases in Residents: 9969

New Cases**: 60

Total Cases of Residents In-Recovery:  5201

Total Deaths:  73

*Case Counts are provisional as of 4:00 pm on 01.21.2021 and subject to change.

**New cases are included in total case number.


Common COVID-19 Vaccine Questions
Will a COVID-19 vaccination protect me from getting sick with COVID-19?

YES. COVID-19 vaccination works by teaching your immune system how to recognize and fight the virus that causes COVID-19, and this protects you from getting sick with COVID-19. Being protected from getting sick is important because even though many people with COVID-19 have only a mild illness, others may get a severe illness, have long-term health effects, or even die. There is no way to know how COVID-19 will affect you, even if you don’t have an increased risk of developing severe complications.

Will a COVID-19 vaccine alter my DNA?

NO. COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not change or interact with your DNA in any way. Messenger RNA vaccines—also called mRNA vaccines—are the first COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the United States. mRNA vaccines teach our cells how to make a protein that triggers an immune response. The mRNA from a COVID-19 vaccine never enters the nucleus of the cell, which is where our DNA is kept. This means the mRNA cannot affect or interact with our DNA in any way. Instead, COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop immunity to disease. At the end of the process, our bodies have learned how to protect against future infection. That immune response and making antibodies is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.

Is it safe for me to get a COVID-19 vaccine if I would like to have a baby one day?

YES. People who want to get pregnant in the future may receive the COVID-19 vaccine.  Based on current knowledge, experts believe that COVID-19 vaccines are unlikely to pose a risk to a person trying to become pregnant in the short or long term. Scientists study every vaccine carefully for side effects immediately and for years afterward.  The COVID-19 vaccines are being studied carefully now and will continue to be studied for many years, similar to other vaccines.  There is currently no evidence that antibodies formed from COVID-19 vaccination cause any problems with pregnancy, including the development of the placenta. In addition, there is no evidence suggesting that fertility problems are a side effect of ANY vaccine. People who are trying to become pregnant now or who plan to try in the future may receive the COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available to them.

 

For more information on the COVID Vaccine in Kendall County, please visit www.kendallhealth.org

Serving the Residents of Kendall County Since 1966
811 W. John Street, Yorkville, IL 60560   •   630-553-9100