811 W. John Street, Yorkville, IL 60560
For 24/7 Mental or Public Health Emergencies, call 630-553-9100
Monday and Friday: 8am - 4:30pm   •   Tuesday - Thursday: 8am - 8pm

Dear Community Members,

          AD_AmaalWelcome to the Kendall County Health Department information pages.  We have organized our programs, our services, and well being information that is relevant to quality of life matters for our community members.  Several community partners have also contributed to the development of a 2021  MAPP (Mobilizing for Action through Planning and Partnerships) priorities and related vision statement:   

  • Increase community population opportunities for access to oral health  care
  • Decrease community population potential exposure to Lyme Disease
  • Connect seniors to assets that reduce socio-economic duress and support mental health

Complete health includes social well being, mental health, environmental health, and physical health.  To this end; we aspire to educate, motivate, inspire, and empower citizens of Kendall County to make healthy choices.

(Kendall County Community MAPP Partners, 11/15)

          I would like to invite you to speak with me about your input,  insights, or questions with regard to this important work. I would also be honored to speak with you about your input,  insights, and reflections with regard to any of the information on our web site.  Feel free to contact me at (630) 553-8097.

Peace, Amaal 


Please click here to view the Forces and Assets of Change Map.

 

Wellness Alerts

CDC Expands Guidance for Travel and Testing of Pregnant Women, Women of Reproductive Age, and Their Partners for Zika Virus Infection Related to Mosquito-borne Zika Virus Transmission in Miami-Dade, Florida

August 25th, 2016

Click here to view in PDF.

This is an official
CDC HEALTH ADVISORY


Distributed via the CDC Health Alert Network
August 19, 2016, 1515 ET (3:15 PM ET)
CDCHAN-00394

CDC Expands Guidance for Travel and Testing of Pregnant Women, Women of Reproductive Age, and Their Partners for Zika Virus Infection Related to Mosquito-borne Zika Virus Transmission in Miami-Dade, Florida

Summary

CDC has previously issued travel, testing, and other guidance for local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission (active Zika virus transmission) for a one-square-mile area in the Wynwood area of Miami that the Florida Department of Health (FL DOH) identified. The guidance for those who live in or traveled to this area any time after June 15, 2016, remains in effect. FL DOH continues to investigate active Zika virus transmission in South Florida. Investigation has revealed a new area of active transmission in a 1.5-square-mile section of Miami Beach. In addition, FL DOH has identified multiple other individual instances of mosquito-borne Zika virus infection and an increase in travel-related cases. Because the incubation period for Zika infection is up to two weeks, a high proportion of infected people have no symptoms, and the diagnosis and investigation of cases takes several weeks, coupled with these individual instances of mosquito-borne Zika virus infection and increase in travel-related cases, it is possible that other neighborhoods in Miami-Dade County have active Zika virus transmission that is not yet apparent. For the identified area of active transmission in Miami Beach, CDC advises that the recommendations outlined below be followed. Based on the earliest time of symptom onset and a maximal two-week incubation period for Zika virus, this guidance applies to pregnant women, women of reproductive age, and their partners who live in or traveled to Miami Beach after July 14, 2016. For all other areas of Miami-Dade County, while further investigations are underway, CDC advises strict adherence to precautions to prevent mosquito bites. Consistent with the August 3 recommendation of the Florida Governor, pregnant women in these areas should be assessed for potential exposure to Zika virus and, when indicated, obtain laboratory testing. Pregnant women and partners of pregnant women who are concerned about potential Zika virus exposure may also consider postponing nonessential travel to all parts of Miami-Dade County.

This is an ongoing investigation, and FL DOH and CDC are working together to rapidly learn more about the extent of active Zika virus transmission in Miami-Dade County. CDC will update these recommendations as more information becomes available.

Recommendations
  1. Pregnant women should avoid travel to the designated area of Miami Beach (http://www.cdc.gov/zika/intheus/florida-update.html), in addition to the designate)d area of Wynwood, both located in Miami-Dade County, because active Zika virus transmission has been confirmed in both of these areas.
  2. Pregnant women and their partners living in or traveling to the designated areas should be aware of active Zika virus transmission and should follow steps to prevent mosquito bites (http://www.cdc.gov/zika/prevention/prevent-mosquito-bites.html). Healthcare providers caring for pregnant women and their partners should visit CDC Zika website (http://www.cdc.gov/zika/) frequently for the most up-to-date recommendations.
  3. Women and men who live in or who have traveled to the designated area of Miami Beach since July 14, 2016, should be aware of active Zika virus transmission, and those who have a pregnant sex partner should consistently and correctly use condoms or other barriers to prevent infection during sex or not have sex for the duration of the pregnancy. The same recommendation applies for women and men who live in or who have traveled to the designated area in Wynwood since June 15, 2016.
  4. Pregnant women and partners of pregnant women who are concerned about potential Zika virus exposure may also consider postponing nonessential travel to all parts of Miami-Dade County.
  5. All pregnant women in the United States should be assessed for possible Zika virus exposure and signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease at each prenatal care visit. Women with ongoing risk of possible Zika virus exposure include those who live in or frequently travel to the designated areas of Miami Beach and Wynwood due to the possibility of active Zika virus transmission. Women with limited risk of Zika virus exposure include those who traveled to the designated areas of Miami Beach and Wynwood or had sex without using condoms or other barrier methods to prevent infection by a partner who lives in or traveled to the designated areas of Miami Beach and Wynwood. Each prenatal evaluation should include an assessment of signs and symptoms of Zika virus disease (acute onset of fever, rash, arthralgia, conjunctivitis), travel history, and sexual exposure to determine whether Zika virus testing is indicated. Limitations of laboratory tests used to diagnose Zika virus infection should also be discussed with pregnant women and their partners.
  6. Pregnant women with possible exposure to Zika virus and signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease should be tested for Zika virus infection based on time of evaluation relative to symptom onset in accordance with CDC guidance (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6529e1.htm?s_cid=mm6529e1_e).
  7. Pregnant women with ongoing risk of possible Zika virus exposure and who do not report symptoms of Zika virus disease should be tested in the first and second trimesters of pregnancy in accordance with CDC guidance (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6529e1.htm?s_cid=mm6529e1_e).
  8. Pregnant women with limited risk of possible Zika virus exposure and who do not report symptoms should consult with their healthcare providers to obtain testing for Zika virus infection based on the elapsed interval since their last possible exposure in accordance with CDC guidance (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6529e1.htm?s_cid=mm6529e1_e).
  9. Women with Zika virus disease should wait at least eight weeks after symptom onset to attempt conception, and men with Zika virus disease should wait at least six months after symptom onset.
  10. Women and men with ongoing risk of possible Zika virus exposure who do not have signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease and are considering pregnancy should consult their healthcare provider.
  11. Due to the ongoing risk of possible Zika virus exposure, healthcare providers should discuss the risks of Zika, emphasize ways to prevent Zika virus infection, and provide information about safe and effective contraceptive methods. As part of their pregnancy planning and counseling with their healthcare providers, some women and their partners living either of the two designated areas (Miami Beach and Wynwood) might consider if now is the right time to get pregnant due to the possibility of exposure to Zika virus during pregnancy or the periconceptional period.
  12. Women and men with limited risk of possible Zika virus exposure and who do not report signs or symptoms consistent with Zika virus disease should wait at least eight weeks after last possible exposure to attempt conception.
Background

Zika is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus). Zika virus can also be sexually transmitted. Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly and severe fetal brain defects, and has been associated with other adverse pregnancy outcomes. Most persons infected with Zika virus will not have symptoms; infants with microcephaly and other birth defects have been born to women with Zika virus infection who do not report symptoms.

CDC’s testing recommendations for pregnant women are the same for those with ongoing and those with limited risk for possible Zika virus exposure who report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease (symptomatic pregnant women). Symptomatic pregnant women who are evaluated less than two weeks after symptom onset should receive serum and urine Zika virus rRT-PCR testing. Symptomatic pregnant women who are evaluated two to 12 weeks after symptom onset should first receive a Zika virus immunoglobulin (IgM) antibody test; if the IgM antibody test result is positive or equivocal (unclear), serum and urine rRT-PCR testing should be performed.

Testing recommendations for pregnant women with possible Zika virus exposure who do not report clinical illness consistent with Zika virus disease (asymptomatic pregnant women) differ based on the circumstances of possible exposure. For asymptomatic pregnant women with ongoing risk for possible exposure and who are evaluated less than two weeks after last possible exposure, rRT-PCR testing should be performed. If the rRT-PCR result is negative, a Zika virus IgM antibody test should be performed two to 12 weeks after the exposure. Asymptomatic pregnant with limited risk for possible exposure who are first evaluated two to 12 weeks after their last possible exposure should first receive a Zika virus IgM antibody test; if the IgM antibody test result is positive or equivocal (unclear), serum and urine rRT-PCR should be performed. Asymptomatic pregnant women with ongoing risk for possible exposure to Zika virus should receive Zika virus IgM antibody testing as part of routine obstetric care during the first and second trimesters; immediate rRT-PCR testing should be performed when IgM antibody test results are positive or equivocal (unclear).

Further information on the interpretation of laboratory test results and clinical management of pregnant women with laboratory evidence of possible Zika virus infection are available below.


For More Information
  • Interim Guidance for Health Care Providers Caring for Pregnant Women: MMWR: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6529e1.htm?s_cid=mm6529e1_w. Summary: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/hc-providers/pregnant-woman.html
  • Fact Sheet with Testing Algorithms: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/pdfs/testing_algorithm.pdf
  • Interim Guidance for Prevention of Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/wr/mm6529e2.htm?s_cid=mm6529e2_w
  • Updated information on active transmission of Zika virus from the Florida Department of Health:
    http://www.floridahealth.gov/newsroom/index.html

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protects people's health and safety by preventing and controlling diseases and injuries; enhances health decisions by providing credible information on critical health issues; and promotes healthy living through strong partnerships with local, national, and international organizations.

View All Wellness Alert Information


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Kendall County Health DepartmentFriday, August 26th, 2016 at 4:17am
As school is back in session, many parents are back to preparing lunch for their kids to take with them. If you are one of those parents, take a moment to look over the following information. You want your kids to get an education, not a food borne illness!
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KCHD, your local health department, is proud and pleased to announce that it has received a 5 year accreditation status from the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) for meeting the national standards of public health performance and excellence! For a brief explanation of what public health accreditation is, please visit the linked site below in the comments. As always, KCHD is committed to your health and well-being.
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Thank you to the Kendall County Sheriff’s Office and Oswego Police Department for training health department staff in ALICE. ALICE (Alert, Lockdown, Inform, Counter, Evacuate) is an class that provides preparation and a plan for individuals and organizations on how to more proactively handle the threat of an aggressive intruder or active shooter event. We are so proud of our partners and thankful for their expertise. This is a life saving program! Info can be found at http://www.alicetraining.com/
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Kendall County Health DepartmentWednesday, August 3rd, 2016 at 9:21am
The Kendall County Health Department is pleased to present: A Public Health Approach to Cancer on Friday August 12, 20016 from 10-12pm. This presentation will address numerous aspects of cancer detection and prevention and is geared toward the general public.
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Kendall County Health DepartmentThursday, July 28th, 2016 at 3:02am
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